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Barbara

Program Running Time 105 min.

Films in Program

Directed By: Christian Petzold
(Germany, 2012, 105 mins, DCP)

A new female doctor arrives at a provincial hospital in what is still East Germany. Barbara (Petzold’s regular star, Nina Hoss) is a transfer from Berlin, and immediately strikes her colleagues as distant and aloof. But there are reasons, as they suspect. Her small apartment is regularly searched, meanwhile her preference for cycling to and from work seems designed to make it more difficult for the Stasi to keep an eye on her…

"It’s one terrific film, as smart, thoughtful and emotionally involving as just about anything that’s out there." Kenneth Turan, LA Times

"Petzold handles personal, formal, and political concerns in such perfect balance, it’s difficult, and not especially desirable, to separate one from the next. The movie is dense but never feels it, assembled with easy mastery and engrossing throughout." Sam Adams, AV Club

"Barbara is a film about the old Germany from one of the best directors working in the new: Christian Petzold. For more than a decade Mr. Petzold has been making his mark on the international cinema scene with smart, tense films that resemble psychological thrillers, but are distinguished by their strange story turns, moral thorns, visual beauty and filmmaking intelligence." Manohla Dargis, New York Times

Picture Day

(2012, 93 mins, DCP)
Director:
CAST Tatiana Maslany, Spencer Van Wyck, Steven McCarthy, Susan Coyne , Fiona Highet, Mark DeBonis, Catherine Fitch
Classification: 14A
Sunday premiere supported by the First Weekend Club

Showtimes

Forced to repeat her senior year of high school, Claire’s (Maslany) reputation is sliding from bad-ass to bad joke. Armed with an acid tongue and shielded by ever-present headphones, Claire locks onto the only student clueless to her sordid rep: Henry (Van Wyck), a nerdy freshman she used to babysit. At night, Claire escapes to raucous concerts where she catches the eye of 33-year–old Jim (McCarthy, frontman of The ElastoCitizens), a would–be rock star who feeds on young fans’ adoration. Jim leads her into an intoxicating world of hard-partying musicians, while at school, Claire takes Henry under her wing. She reinvents her dorky friend as the mysterious rebel, throwing Henry’s life into hilarious turmoil. As Claire dances across the surface of these relationships, she eventually learns hard lessons about the difference between sex, intimacy, and friendship.

Distinguished by a breakout performance from rising star Tatiana Maslany, this punky, authentic, funny coming of age movie takes its place alongside underground classics like Out of the Blue and Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains.

Director Biography

Kate Melville grew up in Toronto and studied film production at Concordia University in Montreal. She has worked as a story editor and scriptwriter for several television series, including Degrassi: The Next Generation, Being Erica and Endgame. Picture Day is her feature directorial debut.

“One of the smartest movies on youth I have seen since “Freaks & Geeks.” Jason Whyte, efilmcritic

 

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“Smartly written and directed by Kate Melville, Picture Day is a well-executed coming-of-age drama that distinguishes itself with its strong sense of its characters and their emotional universe.” Adam Cook, Filmmaker Magazine

“Engaging, funny and evokes all the beautiful awkwardness and confidence of being a teenager … Kate Melville has tapped into something very funny, real, and uniquely female … Tatiana Maslany absolutely steals the film as Claire … One of the best teen films this country’s ever produced.” Katarina Gligorijevic, Toronto Film Scene

Children of War

(2010, 75 mins, Digital Betacam)
Director:
Special Guests: Director/producer Bryan Single will be Skyped in for a Q&A following the screening.

Showtimes

Filmed inside the war zone of northern Uganda over a period of three years, Children of War follows the story of a group of former child soldiers as they undergo a process of trauma therapy and emotional healing while in a rehabilitation centre.

Having been abducted from their homes and schools and forced to become fighters by the Lord’s Resistance Army - a quasi religious militia led by self-proclaimed prophet and war criminal Joseph Kony - the children struggle to confront and break through years of brutal abuse, extreme religious ideology, and participation in war crimes with the help of a heroic team of trauma counselors.

The Banquet

(Legend of the Black Scorpion)
(2006, 129 mins, Blu-ray Disc)
In Cantonese with English subtitles
Director:
CAST Zhang Ziyi, Ge You, Daniel Wu, Zhou Xun

Showtimes

Composer Tan Dun (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon) contributes a lovely score to this visually dazzling Tang dynasty court intrigue starring Zhang Ziyi and Ge You (Farewell My Concubine).

Although it was released on DVD in the US under the unpretentious title ’Legend of the Black Scorpion’, the film’s story is a sexed up Hamlet. Daniel Wu (The Man with the Iron Fists) is the young prince vacillating between revenge and resignation when the love of his life (Zhang) is first married by his father, the Emperor, then widowed and remarried by his scheming uncle.

Mixing extraordinary pageantry with passionate, balletic martial arts sequences choreographed by the great Yuen Wo-ping, The Banquet is a thrilling aesthetic experience in the tradition of Hero and House of the Flying Daggers.

Composer Tan Dun has been acclaimed worldwide for his operas, all of which he has written with western audiences in mind. Vancouver Opera’s Canadian-premiere production of his 2001 work Tea: A Mirror of Soul (May 4-11, 2013) presents a highly engaging and accessible fusion of western opera and eastern myth.

"Highly entertaining costume melodrama on a magnificent canvas." Sean Axmaker, MSN

"Stunningly beautiful." Philip French, The Observer

"As eye-opening as it is thought-provoking… Brings new life to a classic… A true work of art." Bill Gibron, Pop Matters

Barbara

(2012, 105 mins, DCP)
In German
Director:
CAST Nina Hoss, Ronald Zehrfeld, Jasna Fritzi Bauer, Mark Waschke, Rainer Bock

Showtimes

Over the last decade, with films like Jerichow and Yella, Christian Petzold has quietly established himself among the pre-eminent German filmmakers of the day. His latest, Barbara, has cemented that reputation, and won the prize for the Best Director at the Berlin Film Festival last year.

It’s a rigorously controlled film that resists genre shorthand and lets up its secrets gradually. We see a new female doctor arrive at a provincial hospital in what is still East Germany. She (Petzold’s regular star, Nina Hoss) is a transfer from Berlin, and immediately strikes her colleagues as distant and aloof. But there are reasons, as they suspect. Her small apartment is regularly searched, meanwhile her preference for cycling to and from work seems designed to make it more difficult for the Stasi to keep an eye on her.

The enigmatic, measured buildup pays off big time in the film’s gripping climax, when all the pieces come together to combine elements of the thriller and melodrama with real emotional purchase. Barbara sneaks up on you, but it sticks.

"It’s one terrific film, as smart, thoughtful and emotionally involving as just about anything that’s out there." Kenneth Turan, LA Times

"Petzold handles personal, formal, and political concerns in such perfect balance, it’s difficult, and not especially desirable, to separate one from the next. The movie is dense but never feels it, assembled with easy mastery and engrossing throughout." Sam Adams, AV Club

"Barbara is a film about the old Germany from one of the best directors working in the new: Christian Petzold. For more than a decade Mr. Petzold has been making his mark on the international cinema scene with smart, tense films that resemble psychological thrillers, but are distinguished by their strange story turns, moral thorns, visual beauty and filmmaking intelligence." Manohla Dargis, New York Times

Lore

(2012, 109 mins, DCP)
Director:
CAST Saskia Rosendahl, Kai Malina, Nele Trebs, Ursina Lardi, Hans-Jochen Wagner

Showtimes

This gripping off-road movie is Australian director/co-writer Cate Shortland’s first feature since her debut success, Somersault (2004)… In a deadly, real-life variation of The Hunger Games, teenaged Lore (pronounced Lor-a and short for Hannelore) attempts to shepherd her four siblings, one of them only a few months old, across lawless, war-ravaged Germany during the bitter end days of Nazism… Their terrified father (Hans-Jochen Wagner), an SS Officer, burns a huge pile of papers and photographs at their stately Bavarian home before shooting the family dog and disappearing; their traumatized mother (Ursina Lardi, brilliant) decides to give herself up. She abandons her children, urging them to somehow make their way to Omi, their grandmother, who lives in Hamburg, 900 kilometers to the north… Demure Lore (Saskia Rosendahl) and the children—Fuehrer-loving, Jew-hating, indulged, innocent of the war—are creatures of a strict upbringing and years of lying propaganda. But innocence offers no protection against ragged fellow countrymen reduced to primal needs… Begging for meagre food and cold shelter, they meet… the thin, wild-eyed refugee Thomas (Kai Malina) who takes an immediate interest in the budding Lore… Their relationship, at once wary, hostile and needy, is beautifully handled by Shortland and her two young actors. The deep-feeling Rosendahl makes a major impression as an intelligent girl learning the power of her sexuality and resolve under maximum stress. We see the Nazi disaster filtered through her teenage decency and incomprehension…—Frank Hatherley, Screen

"A lyrical, deeply affecting study into a rarely seen legacy of the Holocaust." - Megan Lehmann, The Hollywood Reporter

"Intense and emotional. Saskia Rosendahl is mesmerizing." - Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times

"Shortland’s brilliant new film is an unsettling coming-of-age story that renders its judgement on Germany’s crimes and strange aftermath of the war." - George Robinson, The Jewish Week

Upstream Color

Program Running Time 96 min.

Films in Program

Directed By: Shane Carruth
(USA, 2013, 96 mins, DCP)

A mythic, mysterious and sensuous romantic thriller, this long-anticipated second feature confirms writer-director Carruth (the award-winning Primer) as one of the most strikingly original voices in American cinema. After a vicious robbery, a man and woman are drawn together, unknowingly entangled in the lifecycle of an ageless organism. Identity becomes an illusion as they struggle to find a place of safety and to create something from the loose fragments of their wrecked lives.

"Having the movie wash over me was one of the transcendent experiences of my moviegoing life… It’s utterly perplexing, and heart-stoppingly beautiful, quite literally overwhelming." Sam Adams, The Onion AV Club

“Bold, impassioned, ecstatically beautiful…in a class by itself at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival.” Scott Foundas, Village Voice

"Upstream Colors certainly is something to see if you’re into brilliant technique, expressive editing, oblique storytelling, obscuritanist speculative fiction or discovering a significant new actress." Todd McCarthy, Hollywood Reporter

Trashed

Program Running Time 97 min.

Films in Program

Directed By: Candida Brady
(GB, 2012, 97 mins, Blu-ray Disc)

Candida Brady’s documentary looks at the growing global crisis of trash, highlighting how human health and the environment are threatened by the pollution from burning and discarding waste. Visually and emotionally the film is both horrific and beautiful: an interplay of human stories and ecological disruption. But it ends on a message of hope: showing how the risk to our survival can be averted through sustainable pathways that provide economic solutions while protecting our air, water and food resources

"Crucial viewing for realists and alarmists both." 5 stars! Joe Neumeier, NY Daily News

Clandestine Childhood

Program Running Time 110 min.

Films in Program

(Infancia Clandestina)
Directed By: Benjamin Avila
(Argentina, Spain, Brazil, 2012, 110 mins)

The 12-year-old son of political dissidents fighting the brutal military junta in 1970s Argentina, Juan goes to school under an assumed name and gets his first crush on a girl. But when his parents suddenly need to pack up and run his life is changed forever.

"Most coming-of-age movies don’t open with the prepubescent protagonist’s mom and dad getting into a cartoon gunfight in the street—then again, there are lots of unusual touches in Argentine filmmaker Benjamin Ávila’s feature. Blessed with old-school pedigree (producer Luis Puenzo made the Oscar-winner The Official Story) This ’70s-set story of a boy (Teo Gutiérrez Romero) and his exiled revolutionary parents returning home on the sly follows a well-trod path of viewing history through a child’s eyes. But the way the director throws in offbeat elements—animation, a Moonrise Kingdom–ish interlude in the woods, surreal dream sequences—without diluting the Dirty War drama is impressive." David Fear, Time Out New York

"A charming, involving first feature, Clandestine Childhood muscles its familiar coming-of-age material into something more vibrant and urgent than the usual. Through sharp editing and director Benjamín Ávila’s moment-making brio, this ’70s period piece charts a young boy’s attempts to carve out something like a childhood despite being the son of wanted revolutionaries in the Argentina of General Jorge Rafael Videla, whose brutal government "disappeared" millions just like them." Alan Scherstuhl, Village Voice

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