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Goldeneye

Program Running Time 130 min.

Films in Program

Directed By: Martin Campbell
(GB, 1995, 130 mins, Blu-ray Disc)

Xenia Onatopp and Colonel Ourumov hijack a special helicopter that is immune to electromagnetic pulse. The pair then go to a Soviet bunker that is the control base for the Goldeneye satellite weapons - but a new Bond - Pierce Brosnan - is on the case.

Goldfinger

Program Running Time 110 min.

Films in Program

Directed By: Guy Hamilton
(GB, 1964, 110 mins)

The Bank of England has detected an unauthorized leakage of gold from the country, and Bond (Connery) is sent to investigate. The suspect is one Auric Goldfinger, the richest man in the country - who is hatching a scheme to irradiate Fort Knox. Bond must foil his plots, while avoiding the deadly bowler-hatted Korean, Oddjob.

"A dazzling object lesson in the principle that nothing succeeds like excess." Penelope Gilliatt

Secret Disco Revolution

Program Running Time 84 min.

Films in Program

Ghosts in Our Machine

Program Running Time 93 min.

Films in Program

Directed By: Liz Marshall
(Canada, 2013, 93 mins, DCP)

Are animals sentient beings, or are they property? Photographer Jo-Anne McArthur has made it her life’s work to challenge the widespread willful ignorance that allows animal abuse to carry on unchecked. For more than a decade she has documented animals held in captivity to supply our food, clothing, scientific research, or simply our entertainment. Her photos are sometimes heartbreaking, but also often unexpectedly beautiful, always soulful, and inspiring. The same could be said of Liz Marshall’s film, which gives a sense of the horrors humans inflict on animals, but also the immense spiritual bond which many of us naturally feel for other living beings.

"A superb example of committed fimmaking." 4 stars. Susan Cole, Now magazine

Blackfish

Program Running Time 83 min.

Films in Program

Directed By: Gabriela Cowperthwaite
(USA, 2013, 83 mins, DCP)

Classified PG. Under-19s welcome with adult accompaniment.

Perhaps you remember Tilikum? The killer whale was a star attraction at Oak Bay, British Columbia’s Sealand of the Pacific park from 1983 to 1992 - when he was shipped out to SeaWorld in Orlando, Florida. The sale took place shortly after the tragic death of a trainer, Keltie Byrne, who slipped and fell into the pool. Although Tilikum was officially exonerated from the death, eye-witnesses tell a very different story. And as filmmaker Gabriela Cowperthwaite discovered, this was not to be the last human death associated with the bull orca.

"Blackfish has the capacity to stand the test of time as a gripping documentary synonymous with changing the way people see both killer whales and the multi-billion dollar industry that continues to exploit killer whales as playful tourist attractions" Daniel Pratt, exclaim

"A mesmerizing psychological thriller with a bruised and battered killer whale at its center." Variety

"Has the potential to take our society on the first step in the right direction." Alex Koehne, Twitch

Digital Dharma

Program Running Time 90 min.

Films in Program

Directed By: Dafna Yachin
(USA, 2012, 90 mins, Blu-ray Disc)

Against all odds, E. Gene Smith, a Mormon, pacifist and Buddhist organized a mission to rescue the written legacy of the Tibetan culture even as it was threatened with destruction and loss. The film documents his amazing efforts which set in motion an ongoing project to preserve, digitize and translate 20,000 volumes of Tibetan literature, from medicine and history to poetry and Buddhist texts.

Blackfish

(2013, 83 mins, DCP)
Director:
Classification: PG

Showtimes

Classified PG. Under-19s welcome with adult accompaniment.

Perhaps you remember Tilikum? The killer whale was a star attraction at Oak Bay, British Columbia’s Sealand of the Pacific park from 1983 to 1992 - when he was shipped out to SeaWorld in Orlando, Florida. The sale took place shortly after the tragic death of a trainer, Keltie Byrne, who slipped and fell into the pool. Although Tilikum was officially exonerated from the death, eye-witnesses tell a very different story. And as filmmaker Gabriela Cowperthwaite discovered, this was not to be the last human death associated with the bull orca.

In fact there is little doubt that the brutal conditions in which he has spent most of his life in captivity have made him into a lethal threat to those people who love him most - his trainers. Meanwhile SeaWorld insists there is nothing to be concerned about here, and continue to propagate self-serving myths about the orcas even as they endanger the lives of their employees.

Despite their name, there have been no confirmed attacks by killer whales on humans in the wild. But at the marine parks it’s a different story. Featuring testimonies from experts and trainers, and with never-before-seen footage, Blackfish artfully and powerfully explores the complex relationship between the sensitive, intelligent orcas, the trainers who care for them, and the marine parks that exploit both of them for our entertainment and their financial gain.

"Blackfish has the capacity to stand the test of time as a gripping documentary synonymous with changing the way people see both killer whales and the multi-billion dollar industry that continues to exploit killer whales as playful tourist attractions" Daniel Pratt, exclaim

"A mesmerizing psychological thriller with a bruised and battered killer whale at its center." Variety

"Has the potential to take our society on the first step in the right direction." Alex Koehne, Twitch

Dr No

(1962, 110 mins, DCP)
Director:
CAST Sean Connery, Ursula Andress, Joseph Wiseman, Jack Lord, Bernard Lee, Lois Maxwell

Showtimes

Matinee screening Aug 24 (only) All Ages Show,  Under-19s welcome.
Evening shows introduced by Bond expert Murray Gillespie

Released in North America in May 1963 - 50 years ago - the very first James Bond movie was an adaptation of Ian Fleming’s sixth Bond novel (itself based on a rejected screenplay).

Set for the most part in Jamaica (it was filmed close to Fleming’s estate, Goldeneye), the story involves the assassination of a British MI6 officer and Bond’s subsequent investigation. Topical in its allusions to the US rocket-testing program and its anxieties about nuclear power, the film is also striking for its identification of a rogue terrorist threat independent of the Cold War - in this case, the title character, of mixed Chinese-German parentage, a brilliant scientist who aligned himself with SPECTRE, the Special Executive for Counter-Intelligence, Terrorism, Revenge and Extortion.

An immediate box office success, this relatively low budget film introduces many of the iconic elements we have come to expect from the series - not just the flippant sadism and hedonism that came straight from Fleming, but Maurice Binder’s cool modernist title sequence, Ken Adams’ production design, Monty Norman’s theme music, and of course the casting of regulars like Sean Connery - 30 years old at the time, and more tough than toff - Bernard Lee and Lois Maxwell (Miss Moneypenny).

More than anything, though, Dr No is remembered for the unforgettable entrance of Ursula Andress as Honey Ryder from the waves of the Caribbean… one of the most famous scenes in all cinema.

After the final screening of Dr No on Aug 31 please join us for a James Bond Quiz Night presided over by Canada’s foremost Bond expert Murray Gillespie. Compete individually or in teams. Prizes to be won! Admission Free but VIFC membership is required (costs $12 but comes with a free movie ticket).

On Her Majesty's Secret Service

(1969, 142 mins, Blu-ray Disc)
Director:
CAST George Lazenby,Diana Rigg, Telly Savalas, Gabriele Ferzetti, George Baker, Ilsa Steppat

Showtimes

Matinee show Sun Sept 1 (only) All Ages Show, under 19s welcome

When Sean Connery called it quits (the first time) the producers considered several actors, including Timothy Dalton. But in the end they entrusted the role to an Australian whose acting experience was limited to commercials, most famously the cigarette ad, "You’re never alone with a Strand" and another for a Fry’s Chocolate Cream.

Lazenby received mixed reviews for his efforts but by the time the film came out he had already fallen out with the producers and announced he would not revisit the role. Yet this is one of the strongest movies in the series, with excellent action scenes and a rare emotional core courtesy of Bond’s unusually sincere attachment to a woman, Diana Rigg’s Countess Tracy di Vincenzo.

Bond rescues the suicidal Tracy and is brought at gunpoint to meet her father, Marc-Ange Draco (Gabriele Ferzetti), the head of one of the largest criminal organizations in Europe. Draco strikes a deal with Bond, agreeing to reveal the location of Blofeld, if Bond will look after his daughter.

Director Peter Hunt edited several of the earlier movies and his handling of the action is especially impressive.

The Spy Who Loved Me

(1977, 125 mins, Blu-ray Disc)
Director:
CAST Roger Moore, Barbara Bach, Curd Jurgens, Richard Kiel, Caroline Munro, Walter Gotell

Showtimes

Matinee show Aug 25 (only) All Ages Show, under-19s welcome.
Evening show Aug 29 introduced by film scholar Michael van den Bos.

The Bond producers like to set the bar high with their thrilling pre-credit sequences – too high, sometimes. Roger Moore’s best Bond movie also features the best opening salvo of them all, a brilliantly edited ski chase through the Alps topped off with breathtaking plunge off a 5000’ cliff. If you’ve seen Alan Partridge’s re-enactment you’ll know how great the original is.

Roger Moore’s pick of his own Bond movies is a slick, spectacular, always fun concoction. When villain Karl Stromberg (Curt Jurgens) hijacks British and Soviet submarines, Bond is paired with Russian agent Anya Amasova (Barbarach Bach) to get to the bottom of his evil plan. It’s not an ideal match: Bond had earlier killed her lover, and she means to get her revenge.

Carly Simon had a hit with the theme song, "Nobody Does It Better", and on this occasion you might well agree.

Evening screening introduced by Michael van den Bos

Michael van den Bos teaches film theory at the Vancouver Film School and animation history at Capilano University in North Vancouver. For five years, Michael taught motion picture history at the Pacific Audio Visual Institute, including a course in the history of 20th Century pop music. Through the 1980s, ‘90s and early 2000s, Michael worked in the Vancouver animation industry as a producer of animated films and TV programming. Michael is a popular live speaker and commentator about classic movies, appearing frequently at a variety of special film events and festivals. Michael is a recurring host of Cinema Sunday at Vancouver’s home of essential cinema, The Cinematheque, where he introduces classic family films. For seven years, Michael wrote a column about classic films for Vancouver View magazine and he currently writes film reviews for his website, Movie Mad:

http://michaelvdb.shawwebspace.ca.

"Exceptional… Moore gives his best performance in the series… Film is a real treat - a well-acted, smartly cast, sexy, visually impressive, lavishly produced, powerfully directed mix of a spy romance and a war-mission film." Danny Peary, Guide for the Film Fanatic.

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