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Femme Fatale

Program Running Time 114 min.

Jul 19 03:00 pm
Jul 20 08:45 pm

Films in Program

Directed By: Brian De Palma
(France, 2002, 114 mins, 35mm)

Beginning with one of the most original and daring diamond heists ever concocted - and located at the Cannes Film Festival, no less! - this labyrinthine neo-noir is arguably De Palma’s most underrated movie, a crazy mirror of illusions and allusions to cinema’s love affair with deception.

Passion

Program Running Time 102 min.

Jul 15 10:10 pm

Films in Program

Directed By: Brian De Palma
(France, Germany, 2012, 102 mins, Blu-ray Disc)

De Palma’s last feature to date is a twisted erotic thriller. Noomi Rapace plays Isabelle, a rising star in the advertising world and Rachel McAdams is Christine, her venomous, manipulative, insecure boss. " is one of the great seducers of the cinema, and he proves it with Passion, a spellbinding thriller… Essentially an adult version of Carrie with the cruelties located in boardroom instead of the locker room." Peter Sobczynski, rogerebert.com

Veronika Voss

Program Running Time 104 min.

Aug 08 08:50 pm

Films in Program

(Germany, 1982, 104 mins, 35mm)

The second of Fassbinder’s great BRD Trilogy, this is the true story of an UFA starlet, rumoured to be a mistress of Goebbels, who falls to drug addiction after the war. Shot in icy black and white, it’s intentionally reminiscent of Billy Wilder’s Sunset Blvd but more devastating still.

Mission: Impossible

(1996, 110 mins)
Director:
CAST Tom Cruise, Jon Voight, Emmanuelle Béart, Jean Reno, Ving Rhames, Kristin Scott Thomas, Vanessa Redgrave
Classification: 14A

Showtimes

Jul 19 01:00 pm
Jul 20 06:30 pm

Twenty minutes into this big-budget update of the ’70s spy series, half the cast has been wiped out, and Tom Cruise’s Ethan Hunt has been ’disavowed’ by his employers, the CIA. To clear his name and avenge the death of his mentor Jim Phelps (Jon Voight), Hunt assembles a crew of rogue agents to break in to CIA headquarters, playing a precarious double game with breathless self-assurance.

Reviving the popular 60s TV spy series De Palma and co concocted an elaborate series of conceits and deceits, masks and trompe l’oeils, which slyly undermine the paranoid imperatives of the original series - and, indeed, the Cold War itself. This is De Palma the puppetmaster pulls the strings taut in a nail-biting robbery sequence, switching from micro to macro with Hitchcockian panache, and finally letting rip with a hell-for-leather climax.

"Whooshingly entertaining." Stephen Holden, New York Times

DGC Master Class: Rachel Talalay

(90 mins)

Showtimes

Jul 09 03:00 pm

Launched in 2016, the Directors Guild of Canada is pleased to present a series of Master Classes in partnership with VIFF. The DGC Master Class Series features multiple award-winning speakers from some of the most celebrated and critically acclaimed films and TV shows. The year-round sessions are designed to educate and inspire everyone from established to emerging directors, screenwriters and producers. Plus: the sessions are also open to the general public.

Following the success of our first Master Class with Adam Arkin, we are thrilled to announce our next guest speaker, award-winning director RACHEL TALALAY. With a career that spans over 25 years, her TV directing credits include Legends of TomorrowThe Flash, and Doctor Who to name but a few. In 2014, Rachel became the first American and seventh woman to direct Doctor Who and was responsible for the last two season finales. This year, she became the first female director of the hit BBC series Sherlock, directing the first episode of the forthcoming fourth season. Rachel is also known for the cult classics Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmareand Tank Girl.

Hosted by AMANDA TAPPING, actress, producer, and director best known for her award-winning roles on Stargate: SG-1,Stargate: Atlantis,Stargate: Universe, and Sanctuary. Amanda’s directing credits include the TV shows ContinuumDark Matter, and;Van Helsing, among many others. This year she will also be directing Travelers for Netflix and Chris Haddock’s Romeo Section.

Join us for a fascinating Master Class with Rachel on July 9th as she delves into the experiences from her diverse and remarkable career.

A sneak preview of Rachel’s latest feature, On the Farm will be screened at VIFF Vancity Theatre on July 17 followed by a panel discussion on the important themes raised by the film.

 

 

Beware of Images

(2016, 154 mins)
Director:

Showtimes

Jul 27 07:00 pm
Jul 28 07:00 pm

From cave paintings to virtual reality, Beware of Images embarks on a fascinating journey through the history of mediated representation. Fast-paced and entertaining, this animated documentary aims to inform, while encouraging the audience to examine our relationship with past, present and future media technologies.

Director Sergio Toporek will be present for a Q&A session following both screenings.

Lord Jones Is Dead (free screening with donation to Canadian Journalists for Free Expression)

(2016, 83 mins)
Directors:
CAST Chad Krowchuk, Daniel Janks, Jonathan Pienaar

Showtimes

Jul 21 06:30 pm

Rival journalists Samuel (Chad Krowchuk, Man of Steel) and Vincent (Daniel Janks, Ali) wait outside a suburban house for a woman who is said to have had an affair with a government minister. Photographer Clive (Jonathan Pienaar, Blood Diamond) is with them, there to get a photo of the girl. Unfortunately, they don’t know if this is the right house – or, indeed, whether this is the right girl. And with Samuel being told by his editors that he’s not to come back until he has a story, and Vincent and Clive being told that they have to stay until Samuel leaves, the trio settle in for what promises to be a long wait. At which point the decide that they could just as easily make the story up…

Femme Fatale

(2002, 114 mins, 35mm)
In English, French with English subtitles
Director:
CAST Rebecca Romijn Stamos, Antonio Banderas, Peter Coyote
Classification: 19+

Showtimes

Jul 19 03:00 pm
Jul 20 08:45 pm

Beginning with one of the most original and daring diamond heists ever concocted - and located at the Cannes Film Festival, no less! - this labyrinthine neo-noir is arguably De Palma’s most underrated movie.

Laure Ashe (Rebecca Romijn-Stamos) is the femme fatale in question, and the movie spins webs of deceit and confusion around this confident, commanding but unreliable character; she reinvents herself but fails to escape herself. De Palma, of course, is not so much reinventing as reworking… This is a movie-movie which begins with a reference to Double Indemnity but also throws in bits of Marnie and Rear Window, Obsession and Dressed to Kill, and keeps doubling down on its own crazy mirror of allusions and illusions… The magnificent climax is one of the most outrageous sequences De Palma has ever choreographed (no small claim), a bravura demonstration of artistry and irony.

"Sly as a snake, Femme Fatale is a sexy thriller that coils back on itself in seductive deception. This is pure filmmaking, elegant and slippery. I haven’t had as much fun second-guessing a movie since Mulholland Drive." Roger Ebert

"In his dazzling and luxuriant new thriller Femme Fatale, De Palma turns trash into chic. It’s a sexy, violent, glamorous, sinfully funny movie with a surface as hard and brilliant as diamonds." Charles Taylor, Salon.com

"De Palma is a genre unto himself… elegantly dreamy, rich and strange… Outragous, provocative and fun." Time Out

Passion

(2012, 102 mins, Blu-ray Disc)
In English
Director:
CAST Rachel McAdams, Noomi Rapace, Karoline Herfurth, Paul Anderson
Classification: 19+

Showtimes

Jul 15 10:10 pm

"Classic De Palma through and through: it’s voyeuristic, it’s got femme fatales entangled, and it has plenty of thriller and mystery intrigue wrapped in its crimes of passion/revenge story. If De Palma hadn’t made it, one might have believed it was conceived as a homage to him. Ironically, Passion is a remake of the French erotic thriller "Crime d’amour" by director Alain Corneau. Deliciously twisted playful and arch, Passion centers on two black widow spiders in the corporate advertising world whose competitiveness turns ruthless and cutthroat– literally. Noomi Rapace plays Isabelle, a rising star in the advertising world and Rachel McAdams is Christine, her venomous, manipulative, insecure boss, who’s not above stealing other people’s ideas to keep her executive status intact. Calculating and devious, Christine enjoys toying with her adversaries, so when she and Isabelle cross swords, things get ugly quick and then movie spins into a De Palma-esque Grand Guignol goulash of murder, lust, and cunning revenge.

Bordering on two movies in one again, Passion is delirious entertaining and gnarly in its first half –arguably a compendium of all that makes Brian De Palma great. But like a naughty schoolboy who believes no one is looking, the filmmaker can’t resist slathering layers of style and conspicuous film technique in its second half and it spills over into sensationally overwrought overkill." The Playlist

"A serpentine, gorgeously orchestrated gathering of all of De Palma’s pet themes and conceits, a symphony of giddy terror where people perpetually hide behind masks, both literal and figurative." Ed Gonzalez, Slant

"Truly De Pama-ville." Keith Uhlich, Time Out New York

Veronika Voss

(1982, 104 mins, 35mm)
Director:
CAST Rosel Zech, Hilmar Thate, Cornelia Froboess
Classification: 19+

Showtimes

Aug 08 08:50 pm

Once-beloved Third Reich–era starlet Veronika Voss (Rosel Zech) lives in obscurity in postwar Munich. Struggling for survival and haunted by past glories, the forgotten star encounters sportswriter Robert Krohn (Hilmar Thate) in a rain-swept park and intrigues him with her mysterious beauty. As their unlikely relationship develops, Krohn comes to discover the dark secrets behind the faded actresses’ demise. Based on the true story of a World War II UFA star, Veronika Voss is wicked satire disguised as 1950s melodrama, the second part of Fassbinder’s loose BRD Trilogy (alongside The Marriage of Maria Braun and Lola).

"Veronika Voss (BRD 2), Fassbinder’s penultimate film, was based on the real-life tragedy that befell German star Sybille Schmitz. Schmitz, who was a formidable presence during the Nazi era, is probably best known to American audiences for her performance in Dreyer’s Vampyr (1932). According to Michael Töteberg, a young Fassbinder had read the newspaper stories about Schmitz’s 1955 suicide in Munich and the sensational trial that followed. He and his writers changed the names and employed another vintage Hollywood scenario, that of the reporter who becomes fascinated and then consumed with the life of the person he’s investigating—think of Citizen Kane (1941). Fassbinder decided to shoot the film in late 1981, as he was preparing Kokain, a vastly more complex undertaking. The Longing of Veronika Voss (Die Sehnsucht der Veronika Voss) went into production as an interim project, with the amazing Rosel Zech in her second Fassbinder film. BRD 2 would be Fassbinder’s first film in black and white since Effi Briest; it would also be his last great work, and the final chapter in one of his most sustained achievements, historically, politically, and aesthetically." Kent Jones

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