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theatre

Nagasaki: Memories of My Son (free screening)

Program Running Time 130 min.

May 04 07:30 pm

Films in Program

(2015, 130 mins)

Set in postwar Nagasaki, Memories of My Son (Japanese title Haha to kuraseba) tells the tale of midwife Nobuko (Sayuri Yoshinaga) and her medical student son Koji (Kazunari Ninomiya) coming to terms with life after his death. Directed by Yoji Yamada (Love and Honor) based on the wishes of the late writer Yasushi Inoue (Living with My Father), with music by Ryuichi Sakamoto. 

Free screening open to VIFF Vancity Theatre members ($2 annual membership available on the door). Doors from 6.15pm, screening at 7.30pm. First come-first served.


Pearl Button

Program Running Time 82 min.

Apr 30 07:45 pm
May 01 04:30 pm
May 03 06:30 pm
May 05 06:30 pm

Films in Program

Directed By: Patricio Guzman
(Chile, 2015, 82 mins)

This entrancing, poetic, political documentary from the director of Nostalgia for the Light is a potent reminder of the abuses committed by the Pinochet regime, and a vivid essay on the stunning Patagonian Archipelago. "By turns lyrical, impressionistic and profound." Gary Goldstein, LA Times

Us and Them

Program Running Time 79 min.

May 01 03:00 pm

Films in Program

(Canada, 2015, 79 mins)

Krista Loughton’s very personal, very moving approach to the story of four of Victoria’s street people may make you look at the homeless with renewed compassion and respect. Gabor Mate and Krista Loughton Q&A.

Viva

Program Running Time 100 min.

Apr 30 05:50 pm
May 01 08:30 pm
May 02 06:30 pm
May 03 08:15 pm
May 05 08:10 pm

Films in Program

Directed By: Paddy Breathnach
(Cuba, Ireland, 2015, 100 mins, DCP)

Written and directed by Irishmen in Havana, Cuba, this is an outsider’s outsiders’ story, the irresistible tale of an 18-year-old wannabe-drag artiste learning to put over a song and ultimately winning over his homophobic ex-con father. It’s a little bit Billy Elliot, and a little bit Pedro Almodovar, all shot in what one character calls, "the most beautiful slum in the world."

Too Late

Program Running Time 107 min.

Apr 30 09:30 pm
May 01 06:15 pm
May 02 08:30 pm

Films in Program

Directed By: Dennis Hauck
(USA, 2015, 107 mins, 35mm)

It’s been too long since Tarantino made a twisty, chronology-challenging crime movie, so Dennis Hauck has made one for him: Too Late is a jazzy film noir-throwback set in contemporary LA, with the terrific John Hawkes as a private eye sucked into a very personal murder investigation… A cinemphiliac’s dream, shot in long, labyrinthine takes and released exclusively on 35mm, the artfully-structured Too Late plays knowing riffs on mystery movie tropes and finds room for genre favourites like Joanna Cassidy (Blade Runner), Natalie Zea (Justified), Robert Forster (Jackie Brown) and Sydney Tamiia Poitier (Deathproof).

smalls: forever is a long time

Program Running Time 105 min.


Films in Program

The Pearl Button

(2015, 82 mins)
In Spanish with English subtitles
Director:
Classification: 19+

Showtimes

Apr 30 07:45 pm
May 01 04:30 pm
May 03 06:30 pm
May 05 06:30 pm

GUESTS: 

Apr 30 7:00-7:45pm in the Atrium - SON BOHEMIA - Nyra Chalmer (Violin),Hector Falcon (Cajon) and Joaquin Gonzalez (Guitar.Voice) - is an ensemble that performs music from all over Latin America and Spain with a gypsy bohemian style. The vocals in their performances blend beautifully with the sound of the guitar, the violin, and the peruvian cajon and invite audiences of different cultures to an imaginary trip into the hispanic heritage


One of the most respected and admired documentary filmmakers in the world, Patricio Guzmán explores the Patagonian Archipelago and its meaning in Chilean history—from its use by Chile’s Indigenous peoples to its function as a grave site for Pinochet’s desaparecidos—in this visually stunning follow-up to 2010’s masterly Nostalgia for the Light.

Rightfully earning the film “Best Script” at the Berlinale (the rarest of awards for a documentary), Guzmán’s eloquent, entrancing narration familiarizes us with the film’s remarkable setting while drawing connections and dispensing heady concepts. With its mountains, glaciers and volcanoes, the world’s largest archipelago is practically supernatural in appearance. And bordering it is the water which contains vast reserves of memories and can give voice to the past with just the slightest coercion. Consequently, while immaculate images of ice floes and waterfalls, nebulae and quartz captivate us, it’s Guzmán’s accounts of this region’s chequered history, of native tribes tragically decimated by colonists, of political prisoners disposed of in the sea, that are the most arresting.

“Applying the same mix of lyrical nature and space imagery, voice-over narration, archive photos and footage and interviews [as in Nostalgia for the Light], the director crafts another deeply poetic but also committedly, at times even angrily, humanist meditation on buried traces of the past and how they determine our present and future as a race and as a civil society… Tools associated with fiction are used to tell the truth, and an elegant tone is deployed to disguise a righteous fury.” Lee Marshall, Screen

"By turns lyrical, impressionistic and profound." Gary Goldstein, LA Times

"Guzmán’s gorgeous documentary The Pearl Button is in a class with the other beauty-of-nature reveries like Koyannisqatsi and Baraka, but with its political overtones delivered via somber narration." Sherilyn Connelly, SF Weekly

Nagasaki: Memories of My Son (free screening)

(2015, 130 mins)
In Japanese with English subtitles
CAST Sayuri Yoshinaga, Kazunari Ninomiya

Showtimes

May 04 07:30 pm

Guests: Sayuri Yoshinaga and Ryuichi Sakamoto will be in attendance. 

As Nobuko (Sayuri Yoshinaga) attempts to rebuild her life in postwar Nagasaki, she is met by her son Koji (Kazunari Ninomiya) who returns from the dead. As he fades in and out of her daily life they reflect on time spent together before and during the war. Together with the animated figures who occupy the neighbourhood, the ghost of Koji enlivens Nobuko’s days and helps lead her to a state of resolution. The film poignantly depicts life in Nagasaki after the bomb and offers a perspective on prewar, wartime, and postwar Japan, loss, and hope. Directed by Yoji Yamada (Love and Honor) based on the wishes of the late writer Yasushi Inoue (Living with My Father), with music by Ryuichi Sakamoto. 

Free screening open to VIFF Vancity Theatre members ($2 annual membership available on the door). Doors from 6.15pm, screening at 7.30pm. First come-first served.

Us and Them

(2015, 79 mins)
Directors:
FEATURING Gabor Mate, Dawnellda Gauthier, Karen Montgrand, Eddie Golko, Stan Hunter.
Classification: 19+

Showtimes

May 01 03:00 pm

Guests in attendance: Film participants Dr. Gabor Maté, Hereditary Chief Phil Lane Jr., and Krista Loughton will all be in attendance.

Krista Loughton’s very personal, very moving approach to the story of four of Victoria’s street people may make you look at the homeless with renewed compassion and respect.

With a determination to make a difference, Krista befriended four individuals she recognized from her own neighbourhood: Dawnellda Gauthier, a misunderstood 90-pound woman in her late 40s, suffered from night terrors, walked the streets at night, had her teeth knocked out and was prone to violent outbursts; Karen Montgrand, a middle-aged Métis woman with a dry sense of humour, whose horrifying childhood and family tragedy fuelled her alcoholism; Eddie Golko, a drug addict in his 40s who had a spiritual awakening after discovering Buddhism; and Stan Hunter, 60, a former heroin addict with charisma to spare, who used to panhandle outside Wellburn’s market.

The film traces the ups and downs of their struggles with addiction over the years, explores the roots of their difficulties, and the rewards and limits of intervention.

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