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Femme Fatale

(2002, 114 mins, 35mm)
In English, French with English subtitles
Director:
CAST Rebecca Romijn Stamos, Antonio Banderas, Peter Coyote
Classification: 19+

Showtimes

Beginning with one of the most original and daring diamond heists ever concocted - and located at the Cannes Film Festival, no less! - this labyrinthine neo-noir is arguably De Palma’s most underrated movie.

Laure Ashe (Rebecca Romijn-Stamos) is the femme fatale in question, and the movie spins webs of deceit and confusion around this confident, commanding but unreliable character; she reinvents herself but fails to escape herself. De Palma, of course, is not so much reinventing as reworking… This is a movie-movie which begins with a reference to Double Indemnity but also throws in bits of Marnie and Rear Window, Obsession and Dressed to Kill, and keeps doubling down on its own crazy mirror of allusions and illusions… The magnificent climax is one of the most outrageous sequences De Palma has ever choreographed (no small claim), a bravura demonstration of artistry and irony.

"Sly as a snake, Femme Fatale is a sexy thriller that coils back on itself in seductive deception. This is pure filmmaking, elegant and slippery. I haven’t had as much fun second-guessing a movie since Mulholland Drive." Roger Ebert

"In his dazzling and luxuriant new thriller Femme Fatale, De Palma turns trash into chic. It’s a sexy, violent, glamorous, sinfully funny movie with a surface as hard and brilliant as diamonds." Charles Taylor, Salon.com

"De Palma is a genre unto himself… elegantly dreamy, rich and strange… Outragous, provocative and fun." Time Out

Veronika Voss

(1982, 104 mins, 35mm)
Director:
CAST Rosel Zech, Hilmar Thate, Cornelia Froboess
Classification: 19+

Showtimes

Aug 08 08:50 pm

Once-beloved Third Reich–era starlet Veronika Voss (Rosel Zech) lives in obscurity in postwar Munich. Struggling for survival and haunted by past glories, the forgotten star encounters sportswriter Robert Krohn (Hilmar Thate) in a rain-swept park and intrigues him with her mysterious beauty. As their unlikely relationship develops, Krohn comes to discover the dark secrets behind the faded actresses’ demise. Based on the true story of a World War II UFA star, Veronika Voss is wicked satire disguised as 1950s melodrama, the second part of Fassbinder’s loose BRD Trilogy (alongside The Marriage of Maria Braun and Lola).

"Veronika Voss (BRD 2), Fassbinder’s penultimate film, was based on the real-life tragedy that befell German star Sybille Schmitz. Schmitz, who was a formidable presence during the Nazi era, is probably best known to American audiences for her performance in Dreyer’s Vampyr (1932). According to Michael Töteberg, a young Fassbinder had read the newspaper stories about Schmitz’s 1955 suicide in Munich and the sensational trial that followed. He and his writers changed the names and employed another vintage Hollywood scenario, that of the reporter who becomes fascinated and then consumed with the life of the person he’s investigating—think of Citizen Kane (1941). Fassbinder decided to shoot the film in late 1981, as he was preparing Kokain, a vastly more complex undertaking. The Longing of Veronika Voss (Die Sehnsucht der Veronika Voss) went into production as an interim project, with the amazing Rosel Zech in her second Fassbinder film. BRD 2 would be Fassbinder’s first film in black and white since Effi Briest; it would also be his last great work, and the final chapter in one of his most sustained achievements, historically, politically, and aesthetically." Kent Jones

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