Search Films by Country

Argentine

(El secreto de sus ojos)
Mongrel Media 20th Anniversary

A multi-layered and poignant thriller interweaving the personal lives of a state prosecution investigator (Ricardo Darin) and a judge, with a manhunt spanning twenty-five years.

Winner: Academy Award, Best Foreign Language Film

"The wonder is that the film balances its many genres, from the thorns of murder to the bloom of romance to the thickets of politics, with such easy grace. 4/4" Rick Groen, Globe and Mail

This beautiful film, directed with subtlety and grace by Juan José Campanella, really is about moving from fear to love." Joe Morgenstern, Wall Street Journal

"Secret is bound to linger in the memory for years." Betsy Sharkey, LA Times

Australia

Vancity Theatre Screening

Australia’s submission to the Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film (a co-production with Laos and Thailand) is both a rapturous crowdpleaser and a surprisingly resonant, tough little movie about the tensions between the traditional way of life of indigineous peoples and the energy development imperatives of government and industry.

Brazil

Vancity Theatre Screening

This dreamy, lyrical work is both a love letter and a suicide note, a tone poem created by Brazilian fillmmaker Petra Costa in mourning for her older sister Elena, an actress and dancer who moved to New York in search of a stardom that eluded her — despite the radiant fragments collated here.

"With its free-floating imagery, Elena unfolds like a cinematic dream whose central image is water, which symbolizes the washing away of grief."Stephen Holden, The New York Times

 

“Filmmaking at its finest. Stunningly beautiful, achingly emotional … A mesmerizing, artful and emotional piece of filmmaking that consistently surprises and awes.”The Playlist/IndieWire

 

The Beautiful Game

Our celebration of the Brazilian World Cup Finals kicks off with this Gala Canadian premiere of the new documentary by Renato Terra (A Night in 67), a rousing chronicle of the passion and fanaticism driving Brazil’s national sport, soccer. Featuring interviews with legends like Zico and Romário, rabid fans and archival footage, the film focuses on the rivalry between two of the largest football clubs in Brazil: Flamengo (’Fla’) and Fluminense (’Flu’). The evening includes live music performance by the Celia Enestrom band and caipirinhas.

"Transports us into the football stadium and the emotions that come with it, causing goose bumps to any supporter’ Paulo Vinicius Coelho, Folha de São Paulo

The Beautiful Game

Walter Salles (Motorcycle Diaries; On the Road; Central Station) collaborates with Daniela Thomas on this neo-realist drama about a mother and her four sons struggling to find their way in the favela of Sao Paulo. The son with the brightest prospects is a potential soccer star, but at 18, he’s all too aware that time is running out. As for his siblings, they have more than enough troubles of their own…

"A beguiling blend of urban poetry and extremely well-observed social realism."Wally Hammond, Time Out

"The film’s title refers to the line of players down which the ball is passed when all are playing properly together. It could hardly be more appropriate for a film that confirms that the unflashy virtues of teamwork are as vital in cinema as they are in life."Paul Julian Smith, Sight & Sound

The Beautiful Game

He was the soccer player Pele idolized in the 1940s, Brazil’s best striker, a dashing, cavalier talent with movie star looks and a burning desire to win. But Heleno was also an erratic talent, plagued with psychological problems, and despised by some of his teammates. His career was brilliant, but cut brutally short as he mental problems mounted.

"Fonseca’s handsome black-and-white, impressionistic bio-drama goes very Raging Bull-ish… (Santoro) is mighty matinee-idol charismatic himself in the title role, alternating between swaggering lady-killer and ravaged victim of self-destruction. B+" Lisa Schwarzbaum, Entertainment Weekly

"Powerfully acted and dazzlingly shot in heavenly black and white, Heleno is a feverish opera…. The road to ruin is blindingly beautiful." Jeanette Catsoulis, New York Times

Canada

Vancity Theatre Screening

Biologist and campaigner Alexandra Morton will introduce this special screening of this powerful BC expose about the impact of salmon farming and the lengths to which government will go to safeguard the industry at the expense of wild salmon - and, arguably, public health.

"EVEN IF YOU’VE read the news coverage about the effects of farmed salmon on B.C. wild salmon stocks, the strength of Twyla Roscovich’s documentary is not only how it amalgamates information about this contentious subject but also how it showcases biologist Alexandra Morton’s incredible tenacity and devotion. It’s as disturbing to see the visual evidence of dead and dying salmon—the keystone species essential to West Coast ecosystems—as much as it is to hear about attempts by federal government officials (who declined interviews) to muzzle and punish scientists (thereby also affecting journalists) who are trying to prove what is killing them. Also, if you chow down on salmon sashimi, this is one you’ll want to see before you take your next bite." Craig Takeuchi, Georgia Straight

"This feisty and provocative film is spoiling-for-a-fight cinema… Let the debate begin." Ian Bailey, The Globe and Mail

Women in Film Festival
Vancity Theatre Screening

Curated and presented by veteran CBC film critic Rick Staehling, this illustrated lecture examines the evolution of the opening sequence across a century of cinema history, from The Great Train Robbery in 1903 through Once Upon a Time in the West through to the stunning Children of Men and Seven (and many more).

Vancity Theatre Screening

Morris Panych’s black comedy gets a slick and stylish cinematic treatment in this homegrown gem, one of the standout BC films from last year’s VIFF. Lawrence (Ben Cotten) would seem to have it all—he’s successful, charming, lucky, and relentlessly optimistic. Which only makes the much smarter, much less successful Holloman (David Arnold) hate him all the more!

“Dark, twisted, and really very funny ... a multi-dimensional screamer. One of the events top flicks.”—The Province

Women in Film Festival
Women in Film Festival
Women in Film Festival
Vancity Theatre Screening

Presenting the true "behind the scenes" story of the rescue mission mythologized in last year’s Oscar-winner Argo - this time with due recognition of the pivotal role played by Canadian ambassador to Iran, Ken Taylor.

"An intelligent, complex and tension-filled story that breathes life into historical events that are fast fading from our collective memory.

In doing so, the co-directors give Taylor (the diplomat) and many others their due and give Canadians at large a reason to feel rightly proud." Bruce DeMara, Toronto Star

Vancity Theatre Screening

Last September Neil Young spoke for many when he likened Fort McMurray to Hiroshima, "a wasteland". Local inhabitants were outraged, and at least one radio station banned Young from its playlist. Vancouver filmmaker Charles Wilkinson (Peace Out) treads a middle-ground with Oil Sands Karaoke, a portrait of the tar sands capital which includes both sobering vistas of massive environmental upheaval and an affectionate, non-judgmental look at the folks who live and work there, mostly when they’re letting their hair down at Bailey’s karaoke bar.

"Surprisingly sensitive… poignant, and beautifully shot." Marsha Lederman, Globe & Mail

Vancity Theatre Screening

A love story unlike any you have seen before, the latest from gay provocateur Bruce La Bruce (No Skin Off My Ass) is at once his most mainstream, accessible movie, and arguably his most transgressive. After all, we’re not usually treated to the sight of an 18 year old male nurse hopping into bed with an octogenarian…

« Magnificent » – Le Monde

« Beautiful » – Libération

« Audacious » – Le Parisien

« Poignant » – L’Humanité

« Luminous » – Métro

« Tender and sensual » – 20 minutes

« A beautiful story » – Télérama

« Powerful » – Les Inrockuptibles

« Delicious » – Ciné Télé OBS

« A beautiful movie » – Rolling Stone

« Romantic and innocent » – Europe

Vancity Theatre Screening

Introduced by UBC Film professor Ernest Mathijs, author of the first book length study of the movie, a rare chance to see arguably the best Canadian horror movie of the new millennium in 35mm. Emily Perkins and Katherine Isabelle star.

Music Mondays

School’s out for summer, and son of a preacher man Vincent Furnier (better known as the rock n roll icon Alice Cooper) would like to remind you that there’s more to life than grades, grad and grind. Like sex, drugs and grand guignol, for example.

Vancity Theatre Screening

What if everything you thought you knew about drugs was wrong? What if society has misread - or been misled - about what science says about psychedelic substances? What if prohibition only exists to safeguard social inhibition (and big pharma profits)? Through interviews with the world’s foremost researchers, writers, psychologists and pioneers in psychedelic psychotherapy, Vancouver filmmaker Oliver Hockenhull explores the history of five powerful psychedelic substances (LSD, Psilocybin, MDMA, Ayahuasca and Cannabis) and their now established medicinal potential.

"Fuses science, art and spirituality into a seamless whole." Geoff Olson, Vancouver Courier

Vancity Theatre Screening

In the land of the midnight sun, 14-year-old Tomas returns to the people and culture of an Inuk father he never knew. He and his mother, Anna, arrive in the small village of Igloolik in the heart of Nunavut following the mysterious death of his father. The second feature from the collective which made the acclaimed Before Tomorrow (2008).

"Experiences and milestones achieved amid laughter in the midnight sun punctuate Uvanga, which is bolstered by natural performances from local actors that draw us in while sharing the secrets of a place both strange and beautiful in its isolation." 3 stars (out of 4) — Linda Bernard, The Star

Pages