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Canada

Vancity Theatre Screening

Biologist and campaigner Alexandra Morton will introduce this special screening of this powerful BC expose about the impact of salmon farming and the lengths to which government will go to safeguard the industry at the expense of wild salmon - and, arguably, public health.

"EVEN IF YOU’VE read the news coverage about the effects of farmed salmon on B.C. wild salmon stocks, the strength of Twyla Roscovich’s documentary is not only how it amalgamates information about this contentious subject but also how it showcases biologist Alexandra Morton’s incredible tenacity and devotion. It’s as disturbing to see the visual evidence of dead and dying salmon—the keystone species essential to West Coast ecosystems—as much as it is to hear about attempts by federal government officials (who declined interviews) to muzzle and punish scientists (thereby also affecting journalists) who are trying to prove what is killing them. Also, if you chow down on salmon sashimi, this is one you’ll want to see before you take your next bite." Craig Takeuchi, Georgia Straight

"This feisty and provocative film is spoiling-for-a-fight cinema… Let the debate begin." Ian Bailey, The Globe and Mail

Vancity Theatre Screening

In the land of the midnight sun, 14-year-old Tomas returns to the people and culture of an Inuk father he never knew. He and his mother, Anna, arrive in the small village of Igloolik in the heart of Nunavut following the mysterious death of his father. The second feature from the collective which made the acclaimed Before Tomorrow (2008).

"Experiences and milestones achieved amid laughter in the midnight sun punctuate Uvanga, which is bolstered by natural performances from local actors that draw us in while sharing the secrets of a place both strange and beautiful in its isolation." 3 stars (out of 4) — Linda Bernard, The Star

Black History Month

From the early 1900s to the 1960s, the East Side neighbourhood of Strathcona was home to Vancouver’s first and only black community.The ten video stories of the BlackStrathcona media project celebrate some of the remarkable people and places that made the community vibrant and unique.

Presented by Creative Cultural Collaborations Society in partnership with Vancouver Moving Theatre

IBFF 2013 Vancouver (International Buddhist Film Festival)

From the World Cup to the remote Buddhist kingdom of Bhutan, three students are on a quest. The catch is…the teacher. Soccer-obsessed, charismatic filmmaker, and citizen of the world, Khyentse Norbu may be one of the most eminent Tibetan Buddhist teachers, but it’s a job description he slyly seems to reject at every turn.

"Provocative and surprisingly fast-moving." Ken Eisner, Georgia Straight

Vancity Theatre Screening

Summer war games between the neighbourhood kids turn deadly serious when jealousy and betrayal enter the mix, in this alternately hilarious and horrifying black comedy that mixes equal parts Lord of the Flies and Roald Dahl.

"Sharp, funny and edge-of-your-seat chilling, this darkly provocative actioner, starring a startlingly stellar all-kid ensemble cast, turns a neighbourhood woods game of Capture the Flag into a high-stakes round of no-holds-barred jungle warfare – with the rules about to be broken. The fantasy-tinged film nails the ferocious intensity of children’s games (the imaginary world feels real in the moment) while it plays with cinema conventions (coming-of-age stories, war tales, etc). An after-school special you won’t want to miss." 4 stars Globe & Mail

"I Declare War is everthing The Hunger Games attempts to be, but better - it says more with less, goes farther while staying smaller, and finds reality in a more fantastical scenario… A Lord Of The Flies for a new generation, I Declare War deserves to be seen by adults and needs to be seen by kids. We don’t often get action films of any kind that have this much to say, much less films that are this delicately balanced between mainstream appeal and realistic intensity. Smart, touching, and exciting, I Declare War is sure to be one of your favorites of this year or next." Renn Brown, CHUD

Vancity Theatre Screening

Why is the history of American humour so inextricably tied to Jewish identity? What was it about the Jewish experience that made them so funny? And what’s different now? These are the questions - some of them - that Canadian documentarian Alan Zweig pursues with a roster of fellow Jewish comedians, young and old.

Vancity Theatre Screening

Curated and presented by veteran CBC film critic Rick Staehling, this illustrated lecture examines the evolution of the opening sequence across a century of cinema history, from The Great Train Robbery in 1903 through Once Upon a Time in the West through to the stunning Children of Men and Seven (and many more).

Vancity Theatre Screening

Dark, delirious and made under the sign of Scorsese, Rhymes for Young Ghouls is the angriest, punkiest, least "Canadian" Canadian movie you’ll see all year, and an electrifying feature debut from writer-director Jeff Barnaby. "Weed princess" Aila (the sensational Kawennahere Devery Jacobs) is used to looking out for herself on the Red Crow res, but when her old man gets out from prison things only get harder…

"It’s a tough, gritty piece of work, long on the violence but invested with the poetic sensibility you find in a Cormac McCarthy novel or Tom Waits song… [It] marks the arrival of a genuine cinematic intelligence, one sensitive to life’s more intimate, tender, even spiritual moments yet not averse to slamming the sledgehammer as circumstances require."—James Adams, Globe and Mail

’Exhibiting a vivid eye for potent imagery and a striking sense of the downtrodden vitriol [Rhymes For Young Ghouls] is a tremendously rousing film that announces the arrival of an exciting new voice in Canadian cinema." Scott A Gray, exclaim

"It has been years, probably since Xavier Dolan emerged with I Killed My Mother, since a Canadian director has debuted with a movie as impressive as Jeff Barnaby and Rhymes for Young Ghouls." Marina Antunes, Row Three

Vancity Theatre Screening

Join us for a special screening of a new Vancouver-made documentary highlighting a new breed of ethical entrepreneurs, capitalists with a conscience who are reframing the debate about profit and loss. The film will be followed by a panel discussion featuring Brett Wilson (Dragon’s Den), Joel Bakan (writer, The Corporation), Mark Brand (Save on Meat), RBC Director of Sustainability Sandra Odendahl and moderated by Sharad Khare. Tickets ($18) include post show reception.

Witches

A Canadian-made “porno chic” movie? It never happened! So historians say. But tonight’s screening proves otherwise as the never-released and unknown sexually-explicit [or: ‘X-rated’] horror-spoof Sexcula—-made entirely in British Columbia back in ’73—-screens in a World-Premiere of its original, unplayed 16mm answer-print. Produced with the help of Canadian film tax credits (that’s right—-taxpayers backed a porn movie—only in Canada!), Sexcula is one of the oddest entries in the colourful catalog of “Canuxploitation.”. Special guests to be announced.

Women in Film Festival
Vancity Theatre Screening

Presenting the true "behind the scenes" story of the rescue mission mythologized in last year’s Oscar-winner Argo - this time with due recognition of the pivotal role played by Canadian ambassador to Iran, Ken Taylor.

"An intelligent, complex and tension-filled story that breathes life into historical events that are fast fading from our collective memory.

In doing so, the co-directors give Taylor (the diplomat) and many others their due and give Canadians at large a reason to feel rightly proud." Bruce DeMara, Toronto Star

Vancity Theatre Screening

Last September Neil Young spoke for many when he likened Fort McMurray to Hiroshima, "a wasteland". Local inhabitants were outraged, and at least one radio station banned Young from its playlist. Vancouver filmmaker Charles Wilkinson (Peace Out) treads a middle-ground with Oil Sands Karaoke, a portrait of the tar sands capital which includes both sobering vistas of massive environmental upheaval and an affectionate, non-judgmental look at the folks who live and work there, mostly when they’re letting their hair down at Bailey’s karaoke bar.

"Surprisingly sensitive… poignant, and beautifully shot." Marsha Lederman, Globe & Mail

Vancity Theatre Screening

A compelling, provocative portrait of the inspiring, controversial whale activist Paul Watson, and his relationship in two environmental movements West Coasters know very well: Greenpeace, which he left,and Sea Shepherd, which he founded. 

Director Trish Dolman will introduce the film via skype. Filmmaker Kevin Eastwood will be in attendance for this special screening, along with Sea Shepherd cofounder Ron Precious and Paul Watson for a Q&A via skype.

"Compelling… haunting… captivating." Variety

"[A] thoroughly thought-provoking and emotionally poignant portrait of a Canadian outlaw." 4/5 Katherine Monk, Vancouver Sun

Vancity Theatre Screening

Are animals sentient beings, or are they property? Photographer Jo-Anne McArthur has made it her life’s work to challenge the widespread willful ignorance that allows animal abuse to carry on unchecked. For more than a decade she has documented animals held in captivity to supply our food, clothing, scientific research, or simply our entertainment. Her photos are sometimes heartbreaking, but also often unexpectedly beautiful, always soulful, and inspiring. The same could be said of Liz Marshall’s film, which gives a sense of the horrors humans inflict on animals, but also the immense spiritual bond which many of us naturally feel for other living beings.

"A superb example of committed fimmaking." 4 stars. Susan Cole, Now magazine

Vancity Theatre Screening

Established in 2004, the Student Film Showcase showcases the finest in student films from universities and colleges from across Canada. With the participation of the Film School Consortium this TIFF event presents a range of student films in diverse forms - including animation, documentary, fiction and experimental work - that represent the burgeoning talent of our nation’s next generation of filmmakers.


Vancouver Filmmakers

Genius: The Kevin Aussant Story
Naomi Mark
Kevin — and his mother — always believed he’d become the greatest screenwriter of all time. Gifted and confident, but discouraged by his father, Kevin finally moves to the big city to pursue his dream in this quirky comedy about the unshakable power of creativity.

Placement of the Grain
Mitch Kraft
Sculpted monochromatic figures mutate into eerie renderings that are simultaneously transfixing and disturbing; if the Quay Brothers and David Cronenberg had an animated cinematic lovechild, it might look like Placement of the Grain.

Savage
Dylan Stirewalt
On a small farm, two young brothers spend their day picking produce, tormenting chickens, throwing eggs at trains, and hunting each other with foam-dart guns. Daily life in the countryside is given a sensitive, subtle and patient treatment by director Dylan Stirewalt.

Team Work
Tor Aunet
It’s a beautiful day in the mountains as a young boy, Snorkly, joins a day-camp race and lies to get onto the team of his choice, The Fanny Pack. Team Work is an absurd, hilarious film — a cross between Robot Chicken and South Park, with a touch more heart.


Blackout
Sharron Mirsky
The Toronto blackout of 2003 is the focus of this animated documentary, which stitches personal anecdotes together with handcrafted illustrations to recall a moment when the vibrant Big Smoke was transformed into a magical, mysterious place.

Firecrackers
Jasmin Mozaffari
Lou pumps gas at the local truck ’n’ go, but dreams of one day escaping with her BFF Chantal to "blow up" in the big city. Funny and brutally honest, Firecrackers paints a picture of small-town life filled with truck-stop diners, deadbeat adults, and the teenagers who hope to escape from both.

Sun of a Beach
Natan Moura
Shunned for shining a little too brightly, the poor sun feels alone in its search to connect and be wanted. Good intentions fire up the screen in this fun and cheerful animated vignette. SPF 30 recommended.

Noah
Walter Woodman, Patrick Cederberg
In a story that plays out entirely on a teenager’s computer screen, Noah follows its eponymous protagonist as his relationship takes a rapid turn for the worse in this fascinating study of behaviour (and romance) in the digital age.

Elizabeth
Eui Yong Zong
A sensitive documentary on the preservation of memories, Elizabeth follows Donald as he prepares to put to rest his companion of 18 years. This film is a raw, touching, and at times surprising portrait of grief and the difficulty of imagining life without a loyal partner.

1997
Byron Chan
Repurposing an old home movie clip of a family posing on a boat near port, Byron Chan loops the footage and reconfigures history in this captivating formal study of analogue archival material reshaped in the modern age.

Godfather Death
Eileen H. Peng
A Brothers Grimm-inspired fairy tale given a striking animation treatment, Godfather Death tells the story of a young doctor whose godfather was — fittingly — Death. Empowered by his godfather’s gift of a potion that cures all disease, the doctor soon learns that the balance of life cannot be cheated.

Rosbilt
Marie Tacbas
Toronto artisan Ross Stuart has been hand-crafting banjos and ukuleles for years, but has found it hard to turn his work into a sole source of income. Rosbilt is as much a polished portrait of an honest, outspoken and hard-working man as it is an examination of artistic output as livelihood.

Basilisk
Mami Thompson
Basilisk, a greedy land-based creature with eyes only for a pot of gold, is on the run trying to track down his prize. A colourful, vivid animation reminiscent of the great Hayao Miyazaki, Basilisk and its animator Mami Thompson are names to watch out for

Vancity Theatre Screening

Yes, your parents almost certainly did have a sex life. But don’t worry kids, more than likely you put a stop to it! This smart, sassy Canadian comedy scoots through half a dozen relationships buckling under the strain of reconciling child rearing and sexual satisfaction. Parents of all shapes and sizes will surely relate.

Can, Canada

Vancity Theatre Screening

Part Hitchcockian mystery thriller, part quirky new-wave comedy, this free-wheeling Quebecois audience-pleaser riffs on our brave new digitally interconnected world with nimble wit and an underlying seriousness. A coat-check girl follows a misplaced key into a turpid conspiracy and finds romance - and political engagmnent - en route.

"A genre mashup that keeps audiences amused from beginning to end." Boyd van Hoeij, Variety

Canada, France

Vancity Theatre Screening

For his first North American movie the acclaimed French filmmaker Laurent Cantet (The Class; Time Out) came to Canada to film Joyce Carol Oates’ novel about a girl gang in the 1950s. Inspired by their leader, "Legs", the gang fights back against disciplinarian school masters, abusive employers, predatory males and neglectful parents - eventually establishing their own quasi-"collective". "A frequently thrilling evocation of teen lives." Empire

"A frequently thrilling evocation of teen lives. Proof that The Class and Time Out were no pan flashes. 4/5" Angie Errigo, Empire

"Impressively directed and superbly written, this is a riveting and emotionally engaging drama with some thought-provoking ideas and terrific performances from its young cast of unknowns. Highly recommended." Matt Turner, View

"As beautiful as it is surprising, Cantet’s Foxfire girls appear like the ancestors of Pussy Riot." Les Inrockuptibles

Chile

(Violeta se fue a los cielos)
Cine Chile

The intense, remarkable life of the Chilean singer-songwriter Violeta Parra is explored with sensitivity and exquisite lightness of touch in Andrés Wood’s [drama]. Featuring a searching central performance from Francisca Gavilán, this beautifully lensed portrait moves elegantly back and forth in time to limn the life of a woman who perpetually struggled to find her place.—Variety. Winner, World Cinema Jury Prize: Dramatic, Sundance 2012.

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