Search Films by Country

GB

The Royal Opera House presents...

Paris in 1855, when the opera was first performed, provides the starting point for the interpretation by celebrated Norwegian born director Stefan Herheim. The opera ballet plays a significant role too, with Johann Kobborg choreographing for dancers from the Royal Ballet and Royal Danish Ballet. The story is set to impassioned and dramatic music, rich in showpiece arias and ensembles with striking choruses. Antonio Pappano conducts a world-class cast including Erwin Schrott, Bryan Hymel and Lianna Haroutounian in The Royal Opera’s first ever staging of Verdi’s grand opera,

007 Reloaded: Bond vs Bond

Matinee show Aug 25 (only) All Ages Show, under-19s welcome.
Evening show Aug 29 introduced by film scholar Michael van den Bos.

Roger Moore’s pick of his own Bond movies is a slick, spectacular, always fun concoction. When villain Karl Stromberg (Curt Jurgens) hijacks British and Soviet submarines, Bond is paired with Russian agent Anya Amasova (Barbarach Bach) to get to the bottom of his evil plan.

"Exceptional… Moore gives his best performance in the series… Film is a real treat - a well-acted, smartly cast, sexy, visually impressive, lavishly produced, powerfully directed mix of a spy romance and a war-mission film." Danny Peary, Guide for the Film Fanatic.

The Royal Opera House presents...

Don José (Jonas Kaufmann) is a young soldier in the army in Seville. He intends to marry Micaëla, a girl from his home village, but when he meets the sensual and high-spirited Carmen (Anna Caterina Antonacci), his head is soon turned…Spanish heat and gypsy passion are brought to the stage in Francesca Zambello’s vivid production of Bizet’s famous opera.

Sung in French with English subtitles

Acts One and Two will last for about 1 hour 50 minutes, followed by a 15 minute interval. Act Three will last for about 1 hour 5 mins.

007 Reloaded: Bond vs Bond

007 turned 50 with rare panache: directed by Sam Mendes, this is a contender for one of the top Bonds ever. It’s not just the more probing, psychological script, but the nuanced, inspired performances by Judi Dench, Javier Bardem and Daniel Craig of course – and stunning cinematography by Roger Deakins. This is Bond resurrected, redeemed and reinvigorated, ready to face a new half century.

The Royal Opera House presents...

Powerful music, a gripping story and a tragic end: Puccini’s ever-popular Tosca performed with a fabulous cast. Among the star singers in this revival are Angela Gheorghiu, Jonas Kaufmann and Bryn Terfel. Jonathan Kent’s detailed production draws to the full on the historical backdrop of Rome in 1800, an atmospheric backdrop to the love of the beautiful diva Tosca, the idealism of her lover Cavaradossi and the deadly, destructive obsession of the malevolent Chief of Police, Scarpia.

Vancity Theatre Screening

Candida Brady’s documentary looks at the growing global crisis of trash, highlighting how human health and the environment are threatened by the pollution from burning and discarding waste. Visually and emotionally the film is both horrific and beautiful: an interplay of human stories and ecological disruption. But it ends on a message of hope: showing how the risk to our survival can be averted through sustainable pathways that provide economic solutions while protecting our air, water and food resources

"Crucial viewing for realists and alarmists both." 5 stars! Joe Neumeier, NY Daily News

DOCside

8 players with 703 years between them compete in the World over 80s Table Tennis Championships in Inner Mongolia. Terry (81) having been given a week to live, gets in sight of winning gold. Inge (89) has used table tennis to train her way out of the dementia ward she committed herself to. Australian legend Dorothy deLow is 100, and finds herself a mega celebrity in this rarefied world and Texan Lisa Modlich, a new-comer at 85 years old, is determined to do whatever it takes to win her first gold.

"It is about ageing, mortality, friendship, ambition and love. The stories stay with you for hours, weeks, after the credits have rolled. But perhaps its most powerful achievement is to leave us with a more humane conception of sport, and of life itself."

Matthew Syed - The Times

"What a heart-warmer… ’Inspirational’ barely covers it." Anthony Quinn, The Independent

"An unabashed crowdpleaser bouncing between sweetly satirical and sincerely moving." Total Film

The Royal Opera House presents...

Daniele Abbado explores themes of identity, exile and religion in a powerful staging of Verdi’s epic opera. War has broken out between the Babylonians and Israelites. The Israelites have captured Fenena, younger daughter of the Babylonian King, Nabucco. In revenge, Nabucco vows to destroy Jerusalem, aided by the vengeful Abigaille.

“Domingo’s career, 42 years at Covent Garden and counting, continues to be a wonder of the age.” The Guardian

007 Reloaded: Bond vs Bond

Probably inspired by the success of Star Wars, James Bond went into outer space in Moonraker, one of the most popular of the series. It’s got amazing aerial stunts, some of designer Adam’s most inspired sets, a creepy villain in Michel Lonsdale’s Hugo Drax and Richard Kiel is back as the giant, metal-toothed henchman Jaws.

"Irresistibly entertaining." Frank Rich, Time

"A minor masterpiece." James Monaco, The Connoisseur’s Guide to the Movies

"One of the most buoyant Bond films of all." Vincent Canby, New York Times

The Royal Opera House presents...

A lost key and an accidental touch of cold hands in the dark – so begins one of the great romances of all opera. In his depiction of the tender and ultimately tragic love between Mimì and Rodolfo, Puccini achieved an immediacy, warmth and humanity that have rarely been equalled.

007 Reloaded: Bond vs Bond

n the 19th Bond adventure, 007 (Pierce Brosnan) must resolve a potentially deadly power struggle between two unstable nations, with control of the world’s oil supply as the ultimate prize.

The Royal Opera House presents...

Kasper Holten, ROH Director of Opera, presents a mesmerizing new production of Mozart’s sublime tragicomedy. The impulsive and charismatic Don Giovanni travels through Europe seducing women, accompanied by his long-suffering servant Leporello. When he commits murder, he unleashes vengeance from beyond the grave.

Vancity Theatre Screening

Set on the outskirts of Bradford in Northern England, the second feature from Clio Barnard (The Arbor) follows two young lads, Arbor (Conner Chapman) and Swifty (Shaun Thomas), and their dealings with a local scrap dealer. Boldly cinematic and featuring astonishing performances from the two leads, The Selfish Giant cements Barnard’s reputation as a visionary filmmaker.

"Devastating in its simplicity and honesty, The Selfish Giant is a colossus of feeling." Inkoo Kang, Village Voice

"Boldly, broodingly cinematic… jaggedly moving." Guy Lodge, Variety

"A film of such power and beauty that there will be no escaping it." David Thomson, New Republic

007 Reloaded: Bond vs Bond

Roger Moore’s seventh and final Bond movie is absurd - but how to resist a film where the baddie is an industrialist intent on destroying Silcon Valley to create a monopoly on microchip technology (Bill Gates, meet Max Zorin)?

"A View to a Kill, is an especially satisfying encounter. Opening with a breathtaking ski chase in Siberia, A View to a Kill is the fastest Bond picture yet. Its pace has the precision of a Swiss watch and the momentum of a greyhound on the track. There is a spectacular chase up and down the Eiffel Tower and through Paris streets, which Bond finishes in a severed car on just two wheels. But none of the action prepares the viewer for the heart-stopping climax with Zorin’s dirigible tangled in the cables on top of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge." Lawrence O’Toole, Maclean’s

The Royal Opera House presents...

Puccini’s first triumph returns to Covent Garden for the first time in 20 years in a new staging by Jonathan Kent. The exciting Latvian soprano Kristine Opolais sings the title role. A consummate Puccini soprano, Opolais caused a sensation as Madama Butterfly in 2011, and with Manon Lescaut, the bold but impressionable heroine, we will see a very different side of her. She is matched in star power by Jonas Kaufmann as her lover, Des Grieux, and Christopher Maltman as her cynical brother Lescaut. Kent’s vision of a young girl who faces temptation in the big city will surely resonate with today’s audience.

The Royal Opera House presents...

Richard Eyre’s produciton of Verdi’s masterpiece has been one of the most successful opera stagings in the long and celebrated history of the Royal Opera House. We present the original, definitive incarnation of that production, starring the incomparable Renee Fleming as the ill-fated courtesan Violetta, oppose Joseph Calleja as Alfredo and Thomas Hapson as his unyielding father.

Tickets $22

007 Reloaded: Bond vs Bond

Timothy Dalton’s second (and last) Bond movie is one of the least typical but also one of the most satisfying on its own terms. It’s a revenge movie, for one thing, with Bond going AWOL to take on a ruthless Mexican drug baron (Robert Davi).

Vancity Theatre Screening

Earlier this year, London’s Royal Academy of Arts mounted the first ever retrospective devoted to the portraiture of Edouard Manet. Spanning this enigmatic and, at times, controversial artist’s entire career Manet: Portraying Life brought together works from across Europe, Asia and the USA. Documentarian Phil Grabsky was granted exclusive access to explore the exhibition with the kind of intensive scrutiny (and learned insight) most art-lovers can only dream of.

"Once again the film proves that seeing an exhibition through a camera (especially an HD one) is far better than not seeing it at all." Roberta Smith, New York Times

007 Reloaded: Bond vs Bond

Bond goes to Thailand in Roger Moore’s second outing (after Live and Let Die). Christopher Lee (Ian Fleming’s cousin) is excellent as the villain, Scaramanga, and he brings out what may be Moore’s strongest performance.

Ger, Germany

Vancity Theatre Screening

Heavyweight German filmmaker von Trotta turns her attention to one of the pre-eminent thinkers of the twentieth century, Hannah Arendt, and in particular to the crucial time in 1961 when she reported on the trial of Nazi Adolf Eichmann for the New Yorker. It was Eichmann’s pathetic disavowals of the Final Solution policy he helped frame that inspired Arendt to coin her famous phrase, "the banality of evil."

"Trotta has made an extremely vivid cinematic essay, thrilling in its every minute, deeply moving in its seriousness and suitably unsettling." Elke Schmitter, Der Spiegel

"A thrilling lesson in courage." Deborah Young, Hollywood Reporter

"The best movie this critic has ever seen about the life and times of a writer." Brandon Harris, Filmmaker

Pages