Search Films by Director

Jennifer Abbott

Mongrel Media 20th Anniversary
Director: Jennifer Abbott

Why does the law bestow on private corporations the rights of individuals citizen, but few of the responsibilites? Since its supremely successful release in 2002 this homegrown documentary has only (and sadly) grown more timely. Screening here in a newly revised 2 hour cut specifically aimed at educational distribution networks.

"A cogent, compelling, powerful argument, and a terrific movie." Glenn Kenny, Premiere

Mark Achbar

Mongrel Media 20th Anniversary
Director: Mark Achbar

Why does the law bestow on private corporations the rights of individuals citizen, but few of the responsibilites? Since its supremely successful release in 2002 this homegrown documentary has only (and sadly) grown more timely. Screening here in a newly revised 2 hour cut specifically aimed at educational distribution networks.

"A cogent, compelling, powerful argument, and a terrific movie." Glenn Kenny, Premiere

Luis Alberto Lamata

Community Events
Director: Luis Alberto Lamata

Woody Allen

WOODY ALLEN 4 SEASONS: Woody in Winter
Director: Woody Allen

In his sixth film as director, Allen poked fun at his intellectual heroes, the heavyweight Russian novelists Tolstoy and Dostoevsky in particular, but also Chekov, Ingmar Bergman and Nabakov. At the same time this tale of a cowardly Russian philosopher caught up in the fight against Napoleon bows in the direction of Bob Hope and the Marx Brothers. It is one of Allen’s funniest movies.

Woody Allen Summer
Director: Woody Allen

One of Allen’s best in recent times, this is a funny, wise movie about young Americans abroad, bohemia, sensuality, and the gaudy delights of Barcelona. Contrasting performances from Jamon, Jamon couple Javier Bardem and Penelope Cruz complete the package.

"Vicky Cristina Barcelona trips along winningly, carried by the beauty of its locations and stars - and all the gauzy romanticism those enchanted places and people imply."Manohla Dargis, New York Times

"The actors are attractive, the city is magnificent, the love scenes don’t get all sweaty, and everybody finishes the summer a little wiser and with a lifetime of memories. What more could you ask?"Roger Ebert

Woody Allen: Spring Collection
Director: Woody Allen

The second part in our year-long retrospective, Woody Allen: 4 Seasons brings us to the Spring Collection, and several examples of what Allen himself famously dubbed "the early, funny ones". Take the Money and Run qualifies on both counts: his very first feature as director, it’s an hilarious spoof true crime documentary. Woody plays Virgil Starkwell, public schmuck number one.

"Very special, and eccentric, and funny." The New York Times

"Roll in the aisles, hold-your-sides laughter." LA Times

Woody Allen Summer
Director: Woody Allen

A portrait of the artist that appalled his fans at the time, Stardust Memories is autobiography out of Fellini, the movie where Woody first tried to emulate the greats he admired. The public didn’t love him for it, but it’s a key picture in his own evolution and surprisingly poignant.

Woody Allen Summer
Director: Woody Allen

Defrosted some 200 years after he went into hospital for a routine gall bladder operation in 1973, Woody Allen discovers much has changed in the brave new world of giant GM vegetables, virtual sex, and totalitarian group think. Channeling the slapstick energy of Buster Keaton, Allen delivered one of his funniest movies.

Woody Allen: Spring Collection
Director: Woody Allen

One of Woody’s most popular recent films, this enchanting slice of whimsy casts Owen Wilson as a Hollywood screenwriter transported back to the moveable feast of Paris in the 1920s, home to Hemingway, the Fitzgeralds and Gertrude Stein.

"In Woody Allen’s beguiling and then bedazzling new comedy, nostalgia isn’t at all what it used to be — it’s smarter, sweeter, fizzier and ever so much funnier." Joe Morgenstern, Wall Street Journal

"Midnight in Paris finds Allen in a larky, slightly tart and altogether bountiful mood, giving filmgoers a movie that, while unabashedly funny and playful, provides a profiterole or two for thought." Ann Hornaday, Washington Post

Woody Allen Summer
Director: Woody Allen

Woody goes to Wimbledon (well, nearly) in his first foray to the British Isles—a torrid suspense movie which adds a downpour or two to A Place in the Sun. Jonathan Rhys Meyers is the tennis pro torn between the socially superior Emily Mortimer and sexy (but penurous) Scarlett Johansson.

"Allen’s best since Crimes and Misdemeanors ..."—Roger Ebert

Woody Allen Summer
Director: Woody Allen

Described by Andrew Sarris in the Village Voice as "the one truly great American film of the ’70s," Manhattan was the movie where everything fell into place for Woody Allen, the triumphant crystallization of his cinematic style, sensibility and philosophy. Today, 35 years later, it remains for many, perhaps even most people, his greatest achievement and his most beloved film.

Woody Allen: Spring Collection
Director: Woody Allen

Recently transformed into a Broadway musical, this is a fizzy satire on the pretensions, hypocrisies and indulgences of theatre folk. John Cusack is an idealistic young playwright whose big break is backed by a mobster boss with his own ideas about casting….

"One of Allen’s best and most revealing comedies, as much a moral meditation as it is dazzling fun." Rolling Stone

Woody Allen: Spring Collection
Director: Woody Allen

Incompetent products-tester Fielding Mellish travels to the Latin American country of San Marcos, and quickly finds himself the center of a people’s revolution. Mellish employs his harebrained ingenuity to survive guerilla training and to become a figurehead of this new banana republic. Allen’s second is a zany slapstick smorgasbord of philosophy and absurdism.

Woody Allen: Spring Collection
Director: Woody Allen

The movie where it all came together for Woody Allen, Annie Hall marks both the culmination of his ’early, funny’ period, and the first of his mature, more overtly serious and autobiographical films as writer-director. Winner: Academy Awards for Best Picture, Direction, Screenplay, Best Actress.

"One of Allen’s funniest, and most touching films." Saul Austerlitz, Another FIne Mess

"Woody Allen’s breakthrough movie." Time

"Arguably Allen’s most honest film." 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die

Woody Allen Summer
Director: Woody Allen

For the summer installment of our four-part Woody Allen cycle, one of the warmest and most purely enjoyable films from his mid-career peak. Inspired by his love for Ingmar Bergman’s Smiles of a Summer Night (but shot in ravishing colour by the late, great Gordon Willis) this ensemble romantic comedy follows the dalliances of a half a dozen characters in an idyllic early C20th setting.

"A small treasure."Jeffery M Anderson, Combustible Celluloid

Pedro Almodovar

(Hable con ella)
Mongrel Media 20th Anniversary
Director: Pedro Almodovar

One of Almodovar’s very best, this strange and lustrous love story involves two men and two comatose women (one of them a bullfighter). It sounds weird because it is weird - yet by the end it also feels very true, very natural, and totally heartfelt.

"Talk to Her is totally in love with passion, and with love." The New York Times

"Talk to Her is very much a subversive film, one that takes its time creeping in under your skin. But once there, it’s determined to stay awhile, to entice the mind into playing seditious games." Kenneth Turan, LA Times

"Pure cinematic intoxication, a wildly inventive mixture of comedy and melodrama, tastelessness and swooning elegance." Liam Lacey, Globe and Mail

Richard Aoyade

Vancity Theatre Screening
Director: Richard Aoyade

Jesse Eisenberg take 2: here he’s timid office worker Simon James, a non-person to most, including the lovely Hannah (Mia Wasikowska), a co-worker who is also the apple of his eye. Enter charismatic young hotshot James Simon (Eisenberg again). No one seems to notice he’s the spitting image of Simon, and though at first he feigns a certain friendliness to his near-namesake, it’s not long before the new man has begun to take over his job, his apartment, his girl, his entire life… Richard Aoyade’s Dostoevsky adaptation riffs on Kafka, Welles and Gilliam to chillingly hilarious effect.

"As a pure head-trip visual and auditory experience it feels like one of the biggest discoveries, and biggest surprises, of 2014." Andrew O’Hehir, Salon.com

"Daring, hilarious and wickedly clever." The Playist (Indiewire)

Hal Ashby

Cinema Salon
Director: Hal Ashby

Larry (Randy Quaid), a young seaman, gets royally shafted after stealing $40 from the charity box of his officer’s wife. Eight years in prison is the ludicrous sentence and two navy “lifers”(Jack Nicholson and Otis Young) take Larry from Norfolk, VA to Portsmouth, NH with cultural stops in New York City and Boston. They can’t believe the severe sentence, however they can sure as hell help to bring some fun into Larry’s last week…

Jacques Audiard

(Un prophète)
Mongrel Media 20th Anniversary
Director: Jacques Audiard

More than one critic compared Jacques Audiard’s forceful, rich prison drama to The Godfather. Audiard uses the prison as a microcosm in this allegory for how to get ahead in the twenty-first century.

"A Prophet is the kind of film that makes you remember why going to the movies can be a thrilling experience." Marjorie Baumgarten, Austin Chronicle

"If Malik doesn’t remind you of Al Pacino’s Michael Corleone on his journey from innocence to corruption in The Godfather saga, well . . . he should. A Prophet is similarly, startlingly momentous." Steven Rea, Philadeliphia Inquirer

"It’s a highly original film made in a familiar context, and an exciting moviegoing experience you shouldn’t miss." Andrew O’Hehir, Salon

"A Prophet is the kind of film that makes you remember why going to the movies can be a thrilling experience." Marjorie Baumgarten, Austin Chronicle