Search Films by Director

Pascale Obolo

Black History Month
Director: Pascale Obolo

An exuberant and inspiring ambassador for the Caribbean, Calypso Rose is the uncontested and much decorated diva of Calypso music. With more than 800 recorded songs, she continues to be a pioneer and champion of women’s rights, as she travels the world making music.Promotional partners: Consul Generals of Jamaica and Barbados. Live Calypso performance by renowned steel drum artist Kenrick Headley, to follow the screening.

“An intimate portrait about the “Grande Dame” of Calypso… Reveals her personal story, her groundbreaking musical achievements, her commitment to defend women´s rights, her faith, her worries and fears and above all her strong love of life and people.” Bijan Tehrani, Cinema Without Borders

Jean-Nicolas Orhon

The Best of Hot Docs
Director: Jean-Nicolas Orhon

One billion people on our planet—one in six—live in shantytowns, slums or squats. Slums: Cities of Tomorrow challenges conventional thinking to propose that slums are in fact the solution, not the problem, to urban overcrowding.

"3/4: The film challenges the ingrained prejudice that leads many urban governments to withhold basic services from squatters and force them into apartment blocks." Globe and Mail

"A celebration of the perseverance and creativity of some of the poorest people in the world." Pretty Clever Films

Patricia Ortega

Women in Film Festival
Director: Patricia Ortega

Jason Osdre

Black History Month
Director: Jason Osdre

The racial fault lines running deep through the American psyche are painfully exposed in Jason Osder’s riveting account of the stand off in 1985 between the Philadelphia Police Department and the black liberation group MOVE, which resulted in the death of 11 victims. "The force and intrigue of a courtroom thriller… it ripples with urgency and moral complexity."—Screen

"The force and intrigue of a courtroom thriller… it ripples with urgency and moral complexity."—Screen

"The brilliantly edited tapestry of actions and reactions exposes a pattern of prejudice and fear capable of infinitely repeating itself." Ronnie Scheib, Variety

"Quietly terrifying." Stuart Klawans, The Nation

Michelle Ouellet

Women in Film Festival
Director: Michelle Ouellet