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Vancity Theatre Screening

Greta Gerwig is delightful - a kind of modern day Annie Hall - in this lovely, deft, funny/sad movie from Noah Baumbach. Frances Halladay is 27, living in New York, and not really pulling things together yet. She’s in the wrong job, and her most intimate friend is her flatmate, who’s moving out. Simultaneously optimistic and melancholy, romantic and unsentimental, it’s the finest comedy of the year.

"An irresistibly lovely, melancholic acknowledgment that love is impossible, and that the more candid a young woman is, the less eligible she becomes in the standard romantic sweepstakes… Frances Ha also marks the rare instance in which an actress has the perfect role at the perfect time. Ms. Gerwig’s work here is fragile, delicate, subject to bruising; something that could wither under too much attention. Perhaps Ms. Gerwig is the greatest actress alive. And maybe Frances Ha is just the ghost orchid of independent cinema." John Anderson, Wall Street Journal

"There’s an optimism and an empathy in “Frances Ha” that feels genuine and earned.The plot doesn’t build to a gigantic, sweeping climax, but the understated final moments made me happier than any other filmgoing experience I’ve had all year." Alonso Duralde, The Wrap

Vancity Theatre Screening

Can you rewire the brain, just by taking a breath? In 1992 Professor Richard Davidson, one of the world’s leading neuroscientists, met the Dalai Lama, who encouraged him to apply the same rigorous methods he used to study depression and anxiety to the study of compassion and kindness, those qualities cultivated by Tibetan meditation practice. The results of Davidson’s studies are portrayed in Free the Mind as they are applied to treating PTSD in returning Iraqi vets and children with ADHD. The film poses two fundamental questions: What really is consciousness, and how does it manifest in the brain and body? And is it possible to physically change the brain solely through mental practices?

"Grips your heart from the first moment." Film Comment

"By the end of this documentary, you’ll feel like a kid again, filled with wonder and questions about humanity and yourself." Marco Chown Oved, Toronto Star

"There is something healing about simply watching Free the Mind." Gary Goldstein, LA Times

Vancity Theatre Screening

What if everything you thought you knew about drugs was wrong? What if society has misread - or been misled - about what science says about psychedelic substances? What if prohibition only exists to safeguard social inhibition (and big pharma profits)? Through interviews with the world’s foremost researchers, writers, psychologists and pioneers in psychedelic psychotherapy, Vancouver filmmaker Oliver Hockenhull explores the history of five powerful psychedelic substances (LSD, Psilocybin, MDMA, Ayahuasca and Cannabis) and their now established medicinal potential.

"Fuses science, art and spirituality into a seamless whole." Geoff Olson, Vancouver Courier

007 Reloaded: Bond vs Bond

When MI6 gets a chance to get their hands on a Lektor decoder, Bond is sent to Turkey to seduce the beautiful Tatiana (Daniela Bianchi), and bring back the machine. With the help of Kerim Bey (Pedro Armendariz), Bond escapes on the Orient Express, but might not make it off alive. Sean Connery, Daniel Craig and Timothy Dalton have all cited From Russia With Love as their favourite Bond film.

"Highly immoral in every imaginable way; it is neither uplifting, instructive nor life-enhancing. Neither is it great film-making. But it sure is fun." Richard Roud, The Guardian (1963)

Vancity Theatre Screening

The latest in our irregular series of archival shows throws a well-earned spotlight on the late Phil Keatley, whose long career at the CBC ranged from the 1950s to the 70s. Keatley is probably best known for his work as a producer on The Beachcombers, but here we look back further, to three black and white dramas he produced in BC between 1958 and 1967.

Set in Yokohama in 1963, the latest animated feature from Studio Ghibli is a poignant teen love story, graceful, understated but full of feeling. Written by Hayao Miyazaki and directed by his son Goro, the movie tells the story of a lonely high school girl who becomes involved in the fight to save a delipidated boys’ club house.

"With its beautiful visuals and songs, Poppy Hill finds a deserving place among its Studio Ghibli peers."

- Variety

"A beautifully artful, wistfully nostalgic coming of age romance!"

- Twitch

Make a Valentine’s Day date with Audrey Hepburn and Fred Astaire in one of the most delightful Hollywood musicals of the Golden Age. A romantic comedy with songs by George and Ira Gershwin, Funny Face is a delectable satire on the then-nascent fashion industry, with a remarkable comic turn from Kay Thompson as a Diana Vreeland-type editor for Quality magazine.

Vancity Theatre Screening

The “Gathering Festival” is a multidimensional and multi-day community festival that celebrates the diversity and unique make up of Vancouver’s Downtown South with four weeks of free public art workshops and programs leading to three days of celebrations at Emery Barnes Park (Davie and Seymour St.) around the summer solstice on Saturday June 21, 2014.

Vancity Theatre Screening

A love story unlike any you have seen before, the latest from gay provocateur Bruce La Bruce (No Skin Off My Ass) is at once his most mainstream, accessible movie, and arguably his most transgressive. After all, we’re not usually treated to the sight of an 18 year old male nurse hopping into bed with an octogenarian…

« Magnificent » – Le Monde

« Beautiful » – Libération

« Audacious » – Le Parisien

« Poignant » – L’Humanité

« Luminous » – Métro

« Tender and sensual » – 20 minutes

« A beautiful story » – Télérama

« Powerful » – Les Inrockuptibles

« Delicious » – Ciné Télé OBS

« A beautiful movie » – Rolling Stone

« Romantic and innocent » – Europe

Vancity Theatre Screening

Are animals sentient beings, or are they property? Photographer Jo-Anne McArthur has made it her life’s work to challenge the widespread willful ignorance that allows animal abuse to carry on unchecked. For more than a decade she has documented animals held in captivity to supply our food, clothing, scientific research, or simply our entertainment. Her photos are sometimes heartbreaking, but also often unexpectedly beautiful, always soulful, and inspiring. The same could be said of Liz Marshall’s film, which gives a sense of the horrors humans inflict on animals, but also the immense spiritual bond which many of us naturally feel for other living beings.

"A superb example of committed fimmaking." 4 stars. Susan Cole, Now magazine

Vancity Theatre Screening

Introduced by UBC Film professor Ernest Mathijs, author of the first book length study of the movie, a rare chance to see arguably the best Canadian horror movie of the new millennium in 35mm. Emily Perkins and Katherine Isabelle star.

After Effects: Guatemala and El Salvador

Imagine gold "as far as the eye can see". All you have to do is rip it out of the ground. But one man’s nirvana is another’s hell. Gold Fever witnesses the arrival of Goldcorp Inc to a remote Guatemalan village. 500 years after the conquistadors, and still reeling from decades of US-backed repression, Diodora, Crisanta and Gregoria are caught in the cross-hairs of another global frenzy for gold. Together with their community, they resist the threat to their ancestral lands in the face of grave consequences.

“Beautifully-made. Sobering and tragic, but ultimately empowering.”

The Yes Men

“Tests Guatemalan society’s willingness to confront what might be today’s biggest challenge: overcoming the social unrest caused by the massive extraction of natural resources.”

Uli Stelzner, Muestra de Cine Internacional Memoria Verdad Justicia

007 Reloaded: Bond vs Bond

Xenia Onatopp and Colonel Ourumov hijack a special helicopter that is immune to electromagnetic pulse. The pair then go to a Soviet bunker that is the control base for the Goldeneye satellite weapons - but a new Bond - Pierce Brosnan - is on the case.

007 Reloaded: Bond vs Bond

The Bank of England has detected an unauthorized leakage of gold from the country, and Bond (Connery) is sent to investigate. The suspect is one Auric Goldfinger, the richest man in the country - who is hatching a scheme to irradiate Fort Knox. Bond must foil his plots, while avoiding the deadly bowler-hatted Korean, Oddjob.

"A dazzling object lesson in the principle that nothing succeeds like excess." Penelope Gilliatt

Vancity Theatre Screening

Freda Kelly was just a shy Liverpudlian teenager when she was asked to work for a local band hoping to make it big. Though she had no concept of how far they would go, Freda had faith in The Beatles from the beginning, and The Beatles had faith in her. A unique perspective on the greatest band in the history of pop.

"A satisfying and moving experience." Ernest Hardy, Village Voice

Vancity Theatre Screening

Forget the Troubles and get your "Teenage Kicks" instead! Set in 70s Belfast, this is an appropriately unconventional biopic dedicated to the gregarious godfather of Northern Irish punk, record shop entrepreneur Tom Hooley - the man who launched The Undertones (then gave them away for an autograph).

"An impasssioned, funny and monumentally likeable myth-making comedy." Time Out

Vancity Theatre Screening

Eternally opinionated, brilliantly funny and terminally political, Gore Vidal—novelist, essayist, polemicist, politician, pundit, screenwriter—was the true protean man. If nothing else, this acute, trenchant documentary reminds us just how much we’re missing in a cultural landscape from which the public intellectual has been banished without a trace.

"Immensely enjoyable… invigorating."Ernest Hardy, Village Voice

"Nicholas Wrathall’s treasure-trove documentary does a terrific job of summing up the late political writer’s life and work."Time Out New York

(Hotaru no haka)
Vancity Theatre Screening

Classified for youth: PG (please note this film has somber and sometimes harrowing content.)

Set in Japan during WWII, the film focuses on Seita and his little sister Setsuko. After their mother is killed in an air raid, and with their father serving in the navy, they are forced to fight for survival in the devastated Japanese countryside. Probably the least seen Studio Ghibli masterpiece (at least in North America), this is also one of the most affecting animated films ever made. Roger Ebert described it "as an emotional experience so powerful that it forces a rethinking of animation," adding: "It belongs on any list of the greatest war films ever made."

“Grave of the Fireflies” is an emotional experience so powerful that it forces a rethinking of animation… It belongs on any list of the greatest war films ever made." Roger Ebert

Vancity Theatre Screening

Director Bill Morrison weaves together compelling archival footage of the great Mississippi flood of 1927, complemented by a very well-considered Bill Frisell original score. That flood led to an exodus of sharecroppers, all heading north. The result? Chicago blues, rhythm & blues and, ultimately, rock ’n’ roll…

"Guitarist-composer Bill Frisell’s wall-to-wall, bluesy-jazzy soundtrack beautifully reflects and unifies the visuals while also helping to personalize this distinct endeavor. It’s a terrific achievement." Gary Goldstein, LA Times

Vancity Theatre Screening

Featuring poignant interviews with a who’s who of 60s folk luminaries, and searing footage of Bob Dylan and Joni Mitchell, among many others, Laura Archibald’s doc illuminates one of those rare creative nexus points that defined an era. Between 1961 and 1973, musicians from all over North America (and further afield) converged on Greenwich Village to sing about the radical social upheaval of the time. As these new singer-songwriters emerged, the Village blossomed as a place that promoted a better future and challenged the status quo.

"Evokes the flavor of the era just before the music business exploded into a mass-market juggernaut. The film’s pleasures are the same ones offered by a sprawling, lavishly illustrated magazine spread." Stephen Holden, New York Times

"Makes you wish you’d been there too, hearing it all for the first time." Jay Stone, Canada.com

"Irresistible…I t’s always irritating to hear New Yorkers refer to themselves as the centre of the universe. Except in this case they might be right." Susan Cole, Now magazine

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